rss search

Romans 5:1-2

line

Romans 5:3-5

These three verses are an extension of the first 2 verses of the chapter. As a matter of fact, if we do not understand chapter five, we will have difficulty understanding the rest of Romans.

In chapter four, Paul has just finished explaining the doctrine of justification by faith only. You will notice that he dealt with every possible objection of justification by faith alone. At the end of chapter four he says: this doctrine is not for Abraham alone but for everyone and Paul is saying it should be taught to everyone.

In chapter five verse one, Paul starts with the word “therefore.” As you well know I have often told you to be aware of words: therefore, but, if, but now, and, etc. So I want you to pause and think about the opening word of Romans 5:1. Paul is simply saying that, in light of what he has already said, there are some things that follow that needs special attention.

So maybe we need to get an overview of chapters 5, 6, 7 and 8 before we do a detailed explanation of 5:3-5.

Some scholars have said that in the first eleven verses of chapter 5, we see the results of justification by faith. Then in verse 12 he brings up sanctification and continues this until the 13th verse of chapter 8. From there until the end of chapter 8 he shows other results and consequences of the doctrine of justification, with the ultimate goal of glorification.

Some people have simplified an overview of Romans thusly:

  1. First 4 chapters – Justification.
  2. Chapters 5-8 – Sanctification
  3. Chapter 9-11 – problems of the Jews.
  4. Chapters 12-16 – practical instructions, exhortations.

I am not so sure about that, think about it.

What is the real significance of the first eleven verses of chapter five? Yes, they do draw out certain results of justification, but I think they do much more. And then these “scholars” seem to overlook what Paul introduces, beginning with verse 12, and that is the doctrine of our union with Jesus Christ.

I think that Paul, beginning with chapter five, begins to show us that because of the doctrine of justification by faith alone, if we really believe Christ died for our sins and was raised for our justification, our salvation is complete and final and nobody can take that away from us.

Look at the first 2 verses of chapter 5: Therefore being justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ: By whom also we have access by faith into this grace wherein we stand, and rejoice in hope of the glory of God.

From there Paul takes us to the final end of salvation, which is “the glory of God.” That is what I think he is anxious to teach us, that if we really see and believe this doctrine of justification by faith, and we put our hope squarely on the shoulders of Christ, then we will know for sure that our salvation is complete, is guaranteed and absolute – in Christ alone.

Then he goes on in 5:3-4 to tell us that nothing can shake our confidence, even the tribulations that beset us. Therefore we can, with confidence, glory in tribulations.

He further shows in 5:6-11why salvation is certain, by stating that it is all of God: His love, His character and because He sent His Son to die for us. And if he did that when we were enemies, it is certain that we can never fall since we are part of His body.v.10: For if, when we were enemies, we were reconciled to God by the death of his Son, much more, being reconciled, we shall be saved by his life.

In verses 12-21, he is not dealing primarily with sanctification, but with certainty. That the greatest proof of our salvation and the guarantee of it is because of our oneness with Christ: we are in him and him in us, just as we once were in Adam. That’s why he begins to discuss Adam.

I believe that in chapter 6 and 7 Paul deals with objections to the teaching of our being in Christ and him in us. He speaks of grace and justification by faith only and not of the law. He goes on to seemly say the more we sin the more grace we receive, but deals with that in 6:1-2: What shall we say then? Shall we continue in sin, that grace may abound? What shall we say then? Shall we continue in sin, that grace may abound?

So many say that the doctrine of grace means we are free to do whatever we want, and that is true to a point, but those who truly understand grace know they are striving to do less sinning because of what Paul says in 6:12-14: Let not sin therefore reign in your mortal body, that ye should obey it in the lusts thereof. Neither yield ye your members as instruments of unrighteousness unto sin: but yield yourselves unto God, as those that are alive from the dead, and your members [as] instruments of righteousness unto God. For sin shall not have dominion over you: for ye are not under the law, but under grace. For sin shall not have dominion over you: for ye are not under the law, but under grace.

In chapter seven he takes up another objection: the real purpose of the law. He shows it was never meant to save, but rather to show our need for a Savior. Then he goes on from there, but I will not at this time

So what about Romans 5:1-2?

What about having “peace with God.”? Let’s look at it first from the objective side. In order to have peace, there must be at least two people to make that peace, in this case it is man and God. Something has to happen on God’s side as well as on man’s side for peace to come about. So it seems that if one cannot reconcile themselves with God, they can never have the peace of God or peace with God.

Paul has shown us from the very first chapter that the wrath of God was upon all who came from Adam. Rom. 1:18: For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men, who hold the truth in unrighteousness;

That’s why he could say this in Romans 1:16: For I am not ashamed of the gospel of Christ: for it is the power of God unto salvation to every one that believeth; to the Jew first, and also to the Greek.

He is not ashamed because the gospel of Christ delivers us from the wrath and deals with it positively. That is why he can say here in Romans 5:1-2 he has peace with God.

Fact: There is no peace between God and man, either from God’s perspective or from man’s perspective apart from Jesus Christ. Why?” Because the wrath of God is poured out on all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men.”

Fact: Man thinks that God is love and they believe they can approach him without going through the cross. They are wrong. That’s what Romans 3:24-26 is about. For I am not ashamed of the gospel of Christ: for it is the power of God unto salvation to every one that believeth; to the Jew first, and also to the Greek. Whom God hath set forth to b] a propitiation through faith in his blood, to declare his righteousness for the remission of sins that are past, through the forbearance of God; To declare, I say, at this time his righteousness: that he might be just, and the justifier of him which believeth in Jesus.

Man has a vision of a god that is built upon one’s own imagination. I think God is this and I believe God is only love. But what man has done is create their own god based on their own perception of what they think about God. Then the moment that man realizes the truth about the only God he is troubled and begins to hate God. What they thought was peace with God now evolves into revenge against the God of the Bible.

Man in Adam is carnal or fleshly. Paul says a lot about carnality in his letters to the Corinthians and Romans. In Romans 8:6-8 he says: For to be carnally minded is death; but to be spiritually minded is life and peace. Because the carnal mind is enmity against God: for it is not subject to the law of God, neither indeed can be. So then they that are in the flesh cannot please God.

And he says in Ephesians 2: 3 we are all the children of wrath and in Eph.4:18 are alienated from God. That is what man inherited from Adam. Therefore man is afraid of God and is torment until he trust Christ as Savior. There must be reconciliation if man is to receive the peace of God. It is available but there are far to many that do not have peace because they do not know the Scripture.

Yes, they may think they know Scripture, but their knowledge of the Word is based upon their own intellect or they have become dependent on a teacher they admire, and his intellect. Let me say this, and please take it to heart, the perfect work of Christ has caused all enmity to cease between man and God. There is reconciliation on both sides. Jesus Christ has solved the problem of separation. And so the apostle Paul has said in Romans 5:1-2:Therefore being justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ: By whom also we have access by faith into this grace wherein we stand, and rejoice in hope of the glory of God.

But whether or not you have peace is placed squarely on your shoulders. Do you think this enmity has been removed? Or, are you hoping it has been? The verse says Therefore being justified by faith, (having been justified) we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ:

Your relationship with God will be one of peace if you believe what Christ accomplished for you. If you question the outcome of the cross, I believe you have no peace at all. Until you can forget about the sins of the past, whether committed by yourself or someone else having committed it against you, there can be no peace with God. There can be no peace with God without a complete understanding of the doctrine of justification.

If you want real peace, I challenge you to take a good look at Christ on the cross. Look at the stripes, look at the crown of thorns, look at the spear in His side, look at his naked body and think about the way the Roman soldiers spat on him, gave him vinegar when he asked for water. Look at all that and then if you realize he did it all for you, you can see the wrath of God was poured out on Him, who did not deserve it, for you who did not deserve to receive it. Then understand that God had to do this in order to not pour out His wrath against you. Then rest and have peace with God.